An Open Letter to NQT Mentors and School Leaders about Science Teacher retention

Dom Shibli is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Hertfordshire for Secondary Science (@ShibliDom) This is usually an exciting time of year for me as the student teachers complete their training and start thinking about their ‘proper jobs’ in July or September. I derive a huge amount of satisfaction knowing that they are inContinue reading “An Open Letter to NQT Mentors and School Leaders about Science Teacher retention”

Guest post: Completing a #CogSciSci module (and lesson planning)

Abby Camilleri (@CamilleriMiss) is a Physics teacher at St Anne’s Academy in Middleton. She’s recently completed the (totally free!) CogSciSci Introduction to Cognitive Science module. Having submitted her end of module task (“Describe how you have used the characteristics of Long Term Memory and Working Memory to plan a lesson”) we asked Abby if she’d beContinue reading “Guest post: Completing a #CogSciSci module (and lesson planning)”

Embedding Retrieval Throughout Your Teaching

This is the fourth blog in the CogSciSci symposium on retrieval practice in the classroom, following on from contibutions from Adam Boxer (How to not screw up retrieval practice) and Damien Benney (Retrieval practice, retrieval roulette, schema, spacing and even a nod to Rosenshine) You should read the introduction to this symposium here before reading thisContinue reading “Embedding Retrieval Throughout Your Teaching”

Retrieval practice in the classroom: a CogSciSci symposium

It’s pretty easy to get things wrong in education. Brain gym, learning styles, pyramids and more: history is replete with schools and teachers running with ideas that never had any kind of empirical basis to suggest they were worth pursuing. Unfortunately, even when an idea or intervention has evidence behind it we don’t always getContinue reading “Retrieval practice in the classroom: a CogSciSci symposium”

Explicit Instruction with Choral Response, Think-Pair-Share, and Quizzing

Kevin Fulton, Elementary Science Department Head at Taipei Fuhsing Private School (@Fultonofscience) has been integrating a number of cogsci strategies into his teaching. In this fascinating blog post he examines the impact that explicit instruction, choral response, think-pair-share and low-stakes quizzing has had on his pupils. -cogscisci editor —————— Explicit instruction is a teaching frameworkContinue reading “Explicit Instruction with Choral Response, Think-Pair-Share, and Quizzing”

Appositives as retrieval practice

Birmingham based NQT Austin Dwyer (@AustinDDwyer) was inspired by a blog post on using appositives by CogSciSci editor Tom Chillimamp and has had a go himself. The sentences produced by his pupils led him to experiment in using appositives as a structure for retrieval practice. This seems a great idea and is something I’m nowContinue reading “Appositives as retrieval practice”

Is science a foreign language?

This blog by CogSciSci editor Ian Taylor tackles one of the most intractable problems of teaching science: the sheer volume of new vocabulary we expect students to acquire. Drawing on a range of different evidence sources, Ian shows how if you approach science teaching in the same way that you would a foreign language yourContinue reading “Is science a foreign language?”

Practicals, demos and knowledge: CogSciSci responds

This post launches a new series of blogs, where we ask teachers from the CogSciSci community to respond to a specific article, blog post or educational event. We hope you find it interesting and if you would like to contribute or suggest a piece of reading for us to discuss please be in touch withContinue reading “Practicals, demos and knowledge: CogSciSci responds”

What’s the best way to teach equations?

Teaching equations/formulae/calculations is one of the “classic” difficulties in science education. There’s no one set “best way” and everyone seems to be doing their own thing, normally using some kind of triangle. We aren’t such fans of the formula triangle at CogSciSci for a number of reasons, many of which are detailed in the blogsContinue reading “What’s the best way to teach equations?”

Are your explanations clear enough?

Pritesh Raichura, head of science at Michaela Community School, has started a series of blogs about clear explanations. Pritesh really knows what he’s talking about, and his team have probably devoted more time to thinking about clear explanations than any other in the country. His first blog in the series deals with examples and non-examples,Continue reading “Are your explanations clear enough?”

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